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Bill of Rights,

First United States Congress

The Bill of Rights consists of the first ten amendments to the U.S. constitution, and is a cornerstone of American democracy. George Mason refused to sign the U.S. constitution because it did not have a section containing rights of the individual.…

Elections the American Way,

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has created an excellent resource that both explains how the electoral process works and gives a historical perspective. The website offers an overview of candidates, voters, the party system, the election process, and issues throughout U.S. history. Quotations, pictures, and memorabilia from key Virginian presidents are scattered throughout the website. This is an excellent resource for understanding how the electoral system developed, and it has instructions for presidential craft projects.

Virginia Economy at a Glance,

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

This website offers current information on what’s happening with Virginia’s economy. Don’t let the numbers intimidate you! These statistics can provide a lot of information about everything from the unemployment rate in Virginia to the economy of education. There is also more detailed information about urban centers in Virginia. Using this website requires a little extra work to see what all the numbers mean, but the information is well worth it.

Summary of General Labor, Employment Law, & Health Insurance Issues,

Virginia General Assembly

This document summarizes key provisions related to health care, labor, and employment passed by the 2009 Virginia General Assembly. These provisions do not become law unless also signed by the Governor. Passed legislation varies from things like…

Legislative History in Virginia,

This guide is from the Library of Virginia, Virginia's repository for government, historical, and other scholarly and primary source materials. The guide is intended for researchers interested in locating information about the legislative history of…

The Supreme Court of Virginia: A Moot Court,

Cliff Gold

Individual liberties and public interest are at stake in two Virginia court cases engaged in this moot court: Rudolph v. Commonwealth (2009) and Cost v. Commonwealth (2008). Students will think about and analyze the decisions of the Virginia Court of…

2007 Attorney General opinion on school transportation,

Robert McDonnell

In this public letter, Attorney General Robert McDonnell responds to a state delegate asking a legal question about school transportation. The delegate requested legal advice about whether or not a school could charge a fee to transport students to…

Role of the Office of the Attorney General,

This straightforward one-page document discusses the role of the Attorney General, what she or he does, and what she or he is legally not allowed to do.

What branch of government does the Attorney General fall under? Who are the clients…

U.S. Census Educational Resources,

U.S. Census Bureau

This website from the U.S. Census Bureau has a series of educational materials related to use of the U.S. Census, including maps, community involvement, and data (in pdf format). There are also lesson plans for each section (in ASCII format) that offer guides on how to use these materials in the classroom. State Facts also offers a page on Virginia with more unusual data, such as the number of amusement parks. This website offers a window into how the Census works, and gives ideas on how that data might be used in government decision-making processes.