Web Resources | » Legislative Branch

Virtual Tours at the Virginia State Capitol,

Commonwealth of Virginia

This website provides virtual tours of the past, present, and future of Virginia's State Capitol. With tour guides such as George Washington and members of the recent restoration team, users can explore different aspects of the Capitol's history and role in Virginia government.

Who’s My Legislator?,

Virginia General Assembly

The Virginia General Assembly has created a quick form to look up your state elected officials. By filling in your address, you can find who represents your interests in the Virginia Senate and House of Representatives, as well as in the U.S. Congress. The website also provides contact information for your legislators, as well as a convenient link to each legislator’s official website.

Virginia General Assembly Homepage,

Virginia General Assembly

This website offers a diverse array of information about the Commonwealth’s legislative branch: live audio and video streams of House and Senate chamber discussions, a guide to contacting your legislator, and information on visiting the Capitol. It is also a portal for Capitol Classroom, an educational resource about the Virginia General Assembly. The website provides core information on the General Assembly, and is a good jumping-off point for further study.

National Conference of State Legislatures,

NCSL

The National Conference of State Legislatures is a bipartisan organization that provides networking and information services to state legislators from Virginia and around the country. While some services are restricted to legislators, NCSL offers up-to-date information on issues that affect policymakers at the state level, such as the Federal budget, immigration, and ethics. The website is an excellent source for information on State-Federal relations and the division of power.

Capitol Classroom: Just for Teachers,

Virginia General Assembly

Capitol Classroom’s “Just for Teachers’ section offers lesson plans related to the Legislative branch, Capitol building, and civics education in general. An important lesson plan is the “Impact of Government on the Individual,” which can help users think about how government affects their everyday lives. The website also includes a list of key terms and their definitions— everything from George Washington to the House of Delegates mace.

How to Track a Bill: Virginia Legislative Assembly,

Virginia General Assembly

The Virginia General Assembly has provided a guide on how to track a bill for students in grades 9–12. The guide provides definitions of common terms, such as “standing committee” and “HB.” Ultimately, the guide outlines how to use the Legislative Information System to access anything from bills to daily floor calendars from the Virginia General Assembly. This website is an excellent tool to find out the day-to-day actions of the Virginia General Assembly, as well as how upcoming legislation may affect everyday people.

Congress.org,

Roll Call, Capitol Advantage

Congress.org offers headlines of current bills in the US Congress, as well as a public forum for constituents to discuss those issues. Users can search many features of the website by state. One interesting feature is a list of letters from Virginia constituents to elected officials submitted through Congress.org. Another is contact information for local officials in Virginia. This website is a gateway to find out what’s happening in government, find out what other people are saying about it, and send your own message to the people who represent you in government.

Searchable Virginia Constitution,

Virginia General Assembly

This website, maintained by the Virginia General Assembly, offers a quick reference to each article and section of the Virginia Constitution by keywords. For example, Article I Section 1 relates to “Equality and the Rights of Men.” This feature simplifies finding a relevant section of the Virginia Constitution, and complements the U.S. Constitution Guide. The website also contains a downloadable pdf of the current Virginia Constitution.