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Virginia Constitution, 1830,

Virginia General Assembly

Virginia signed its first constitution in 1776 upon the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Since that time, there have been frequent amendments and six major revisions to the constitution: 1830, 1851, 1864, 1870, 1902, and 1971. Our current…

Bill of Rights,

First United States Congress

The Bill of Rights consists of the first ten amendments to the U.S. constitution, and is a cornerstone of American democracy. George Mason refused to sign the U.S. constitution because it did not have a section containing rights of the individual.…

Monticello Classroom,

Thomas Jefferson Foundation

The Monticello Classroom offers extensive information about Thomas Jefferson, Virginia history, the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, and other important aspects surrounding the founding of the United States. The website also allows visitors to log in and create projects, design lesson plans, or do homework. It also features fun information, such as why Thomas Jefferson is on the nickel, and how to make ice cream the colonial way.

Elections the American Way,

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has created an excellent resource that both explains how the electoral process works and gives a historical perspective. The website offers an overview of candidates, voters, the party system, the election process, and issues throughout U.S. history. Quotations, pictures, and memorabilia from key Virginian presidents are scattered throughout the website. This is an excellent resource for understanding how the electoral system developed, and it has instructions for presidential craft projects.

Stickman Game: Virginia History,

Office of the Governor

There are several games on the Kid’s Commonwealth website, which cover issues such as Famous Virginians and the Executive Mansion. The most prominent game is the “Stickman Game,” a flash game that offers a tutorial on Virginia History based on the SOLs. Try it, and learn something new about the founding of the United States or Virginia’s first African American governor.

Electoral College Policy Brief to the Governor,

Georgia Leser, Loudoun County Public Schools

Since ratification of the Constitution, the Electoral College has been the method used for electing the President and Vice President of the United States and is outlined in Article II of the Constitution. The Electoral College elects the President,…

Facts and History - Governors,

This simple resource offers the names, dates served, and party affiliations of Virginia's governors from 1776 to 2006. If read carefully, the data reveals clues to Virginia's political leanings.

What are some trends in the party…

Searchable Virginia Constitution,

Virginia General Assembly

This website, maintained by the Virginia General Assembly, offers a quick reference to each article and section of the Virginia Constitution by keywords. For example, Article I Section 1 relates to “Equality and the Rights of Men.” This feature simplifies finding a relevant section of the Virginia Constitution, and complements the U.S. Constitution Guide. The website also contains a downloadable pdf of the current Virginia Constitution.

Constitutional Issues: Separation of Powers,

National Archives and Records Administration

The National Archives website features a lesson plan about the separation of powers on a federal and state level that revolves around a history of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s court packing during the 1930s. It includes background information on the time period, as well as a primary source document in which a newspaper publisher warns that FDR’s actions may lead to “absolutism and complete dictatorial power.” The website also features a document analysis worksheet and teaching activities.